Dr. David Begay, co-investigator for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study facilitates a focus group during trainings that were held at the five major hospitals on Navajo lands where the study will take place.

Dr. David Begay, co-investigator for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study facilitates a focus group during trainings that were held at the five major hospitals on Navajo lands where the study will take place.

FOREST LAKE, AZ – The Navajo Birth Cohort Study has 10 videos featured on You Tube for public information and outreach to possible participants for this landmark study on Navajo lands.  As the study kicked off in February 2013 with its first participant who was recruited at Chinle Comprehensive Health Care Facility.  As the study got underway, more participants were recruited at Tuba City Regional Health Care Center, Gallup Indian Medical Center, Tsehootsoi Medical Center in Fort Defiance, AZ, and Northern Navajo Medical Center in Shiprock, NM.  The Navajo Cohort Study staff are trained, and each participant hospital has made a complete run through of the study’s protocol.  Here are the 10 Navajo Birth Cohort Study videos on You Tube.
Overview of Navajo Birth Cohort Study
http://youtu.be/kcJebbN4e_I

(L to R): Cora Maxx Phillips, Dr. David Begay, Dr. Johnnye Lewis, Chris Shuey, Malcolm Benally, and Teddy Nez.

(L to R): Cora Maxx Phillips, Dr. David Begay, Dr. Johnnye Lewis, Chris Shuey, Malcolm Benally, and Teddy Nez.

An introduction to the Navajo Birth Cohort Study, a brief narration about why the study is taking place on moms-to-be, baby, and dad, too!  The study has been approved and funded by Congress for five years in January 2013.  The study is being conducted with partnerships between the University of New Mexico’s Community Environmental Health Programs, Southwest Research and Information Center (SRIC), Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency, Navajo Nation Division of Health (NNDOH), Navajo Area Indian Health Services, and the Center for Disease Control/Agency of Toxic Substances Disease Registry.
Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part II Eligibility Screening
http://youtu.be/gCVcHVlgx2E

Chris Vining, UNM, interview session at KYAT in Gallup, NM.  (Photo by Teddy Nez)

Chris Vining, UNM, interview session at KYAT in Gallup, NM. (Photo by Teddy Nez)

This lively video featured Navajo actors and was produced with the help of staff at the Chinle Comprehensive Health Facility when the Navajo Birth Cohort Study staff trainings were first being conducted during winter and spring 2012.  The production showed how a lot of younger Navajo women and youth alike wanted are lending their support to spearheading the project from its beginnings.  The short mock survey that was re-enacted for this video can also be conducted entirely in the Navajo language at the participant’s request during enrollment!

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part III Legacy of Uranium
http://youtu.be/I-hUV5hmMvg

Dr. David Begay, co-investigator for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study facilitates a focus group during trainings that were held at the five major hospitals on Navajo lands where the study will take place.

Dr. David Begay, co-investigator for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study facilitates a focus group during trainings that were held at the five major hospitals on Navajo lands where the study will take place.

A short educational piece about the history of uranium and the need for studies on the Navajo reservation as told by co-Investigator for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study Dr. David Begay from Ganado, Arizona.  Dr. Begay has been instrumental in providing a communication link to the traditional Navajo speaking communities and the scientific community.  This short video shows how the study utilizes both the Navajo and English languages to educate the public about uranium.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part IV Perspectives

http://youtu.be/BMLqB5w6LQg

Goats take shade from the summer heat in Monument Valley, Utah.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

Goats take shade from the summer heat in Monument Valley, Utah. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

After screening the first videos to the Navajo communities, a lot of Elders and community leaders suggested that the project use photos of the landscape and animals to temper the difficult story of uranium exposure and health.  This video features President Ben Shelly giving a background on the work the Navajo communities took on until they testified before the U.S. Congress during the Waxman hearings in Washington D.C.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part V Red Water Pond Road
http://youtu.be/s1C_aAPdg6s

A march in Church Rock, NM to commemorate the people affected by the 1979 uranium tailings spill.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

A march in Church Rock, NM to commemorate the people affected by the 1979 uranium tailings spill. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

Every year in mid-July, the Red Water Pond Road, a community near Church Rock, NM commemorates the 1979 United Nuclear dam break that is considered one of the worst uranium disasters comparable to Chernobyl and Three Mile Island.  The leaders who speak out in this video represent the main issues that face Navajo communities today.

 

 

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part VI Outreach
http://youtu.be/tUM_NdjvrDs

A view of the Comb Ridge incline near Kayenta, AZ.  The Comb Ridge inclines extends in uranium country.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

A view of the Comb Ridge incline near Kayenta, AZ. The Comb Ridge inclines extends in uranium country. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

The Navajo Birth Cohort Study staff is continually doing outreach throughout the Navajo Reservation with the goal of getting 1,500 moms-to-be and their baby to participate in this study.  Videos like this serve as updates to the work that is ongoing with the study.  The elders and community members who viewed these short videos enjoy the landscape photography that accompanies the more heart wrenching stories that belong to the Navajo legacy of uranium.

 

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part VII:  A Father Speaks Out

http://youtu.be/fUTBVQcoqa8

A shed set up for an interview near Shonto, Arizona.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

A shed set up for an interview near Shonto, Arizona. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

In this short video, a heavy metal musician and guitarist from the Pinon community talks about coping with health issues as a young father.  The film is a monologue that reveals the vast resources available to Navajo youth and their willingness to take it for granted, until it really matters.  It has been a great opportunity for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study to have many community members who provided their own stories and inspired more to come forward and tell their stories.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study:  Get Your Water Tested

http://youtu.be/YcsUfn5H7oQ

Windmill near the Navajo Generating Station, Page, AZ.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

Windmill near the Navajo Generating Station, Page, AZ. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

Produced and Directed by Melissa Samuels, this short piece on the importance of getting your water tested is just over two minutes long, but the depth of information in this piece makes this video compelling.

 

 

 

 

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part IV:  The Leadership

http://youtu.be/y-GV0bSWF_0

Anna Rondon, CHERS Supervisor meets with Navajo Nation Vice President  Rex Lee jim.  Photo by Malcolm Benally

Anna Rondon, CHERS Supervisor meets with Navajo Nation Vice President Rex Lee jim. Photo by Malcolm Benally

The Navajo Nation leaders speaking about the importance of studies on uranium issues to keep “environmental contamination” from becoming an epidemic focus on the meaning of the Navajo Birth Cohort Study.  The need for more documentation of the lands and water that has already been contaminated, and the need to find monies for specialists to help those afflicted by long-term exposure to uranium are all long-term goals.

 

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part X:  PSA

Teddy Nez, Research Field Staff from the Southwest Research and Information Center shares a story with protest marchers about living with the aftermath of the Church Rock oil spill.  Photo by Malcolm Benally

Teddy Nez, Research Field Staff from the Southwest Research and Information Center shares a story with protest marchers about living with the aftermath of the Church Rock oil spill. Photo by Malcolm Benally

The short videos in our outreach series features our radio and public events portfolio.  The Navajo Birth Cohort Study has been on radio shows like Native America Calling, KTNN Focus Forum, and on news reports on NPR and reservation radio stations.  These are times when the inter-agencies and partnerships developed through the Navajo Birth Cohort Study works together to promote the study.  Getting everyone to talk about this important study and get people to participate requires support and leadership.  You will find voices from the community,  Navajo Nation leaders, service providers, and youth speaking out on behalf of the Navajo Birth Cohort Study.  When the whole culture is speaking, that is when everyone learns.