Miss Navajo Natasha Hardy poses with (L to R) Rebecca Tsosie, Olivia Muskett, Roxanne Thompson, Miss Navajo Natasha Hardy, Anna Rondon, and Qeturah Anderson at Navajo Nation Broadcast Services meeting room.  (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

Miss Navajo Natasha Hardy poses with (L to R) Rebecca Tsosie, Olivia Muskett, Roxanne Thompson, Miss Navajo Natasha Hardy, Anna Rondon, and Qeturah Anderson at Navajo Nation Broadcast Services meeting room. (Photo by Malcolm Benally)

WINDOW ROCK, AZ –  The Community Health Environmental Research Staff (CHERS) staff bring the Navajo Birth Cohort Study to Navajo communities to recruit mother-infant pairs to participate in a study that will help to better understand the impacts of long-term uranium exposure on developmental outcomes.  Fathers are strongly encouraged to participate.

In a recent training meeting, the CHERS staff discussed new strategies in bringing information about the study to the public.  On Friday, December 09, 2013, the staff began reading excerpts from a book entitled Journey Women.  The book features prose poetry and narratives that focus on wellness in various facets of womanhood, anything from financial literacy, to looking at your hair and skin closely for changes, and overcoming emotional barriers.  The CHERS staff will do two-minute readings on the book’s subject matter that are also crucial information to be shared by the Navajo Birth Cohort Study.

 

CHERS staff who attended a  training workshop at the Navajo Nation Museum during the International Uranium Film Festival, May 03, 2013.

CHERS staff who attended a training workshop at the Navajo Nation Museum during the International Uranium Film Festival, May 03, 2013.